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Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators

best motorcycle tyre pump - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators

Keeping your tyres at the correct pressure is essential to keep your motorcycle handling properly and ensuring that the tyres provide maximum grip and braking performance. It will also reduce wear and lower fuel consumption, saving you money in the long run.

If you’ve already checked out our Motorcycle Tyre Pressure Gauges Guide, you’ll know there are plenty of options in there to help you check your tyre pressure at home or out on the road.

Petrol Station Tyre Pumps

As a last resort, a garage air machine is a good way of getting some air into an underinflated tyre but it’s hard to know if the machine is accurate, so it’s best not to set your pressures from a garage forecourt machine but it’s far better than running an under or severely over-inflated tyre.

Manual, Electric or Canister

Like pressure gauges, air pumps come in digital or analogue design. You can also use gas canisters – essential when you’re fixing a flat tyre but also handy if you’re in the middle of nowhere and your tyres are underinflated.

Pumps are manually or electrically operated; with hugely varying price points. 

The type of inflator you choose will depend on the application. If you’re a track day regular or a racer, you will probably gravitate towards a foot-pump or track pump, both are good at enabling you to add 5psi with little effort.

For those less inclined to break into a sweat you can use a portable electric tyre inflator, which either uses mains power, the 12v cigarette lighter socket from your car or can be wired into the bike’s electrical system.

If you’re off touring or adventure riding, you might want to adjust your tyre pressures more often or have an emergency backup. There are small 12v electric pumps which run from your bike’s power or you could go for a tiny bicycle hand pump if travelling light is the objective. A good safety net comes in the form of a gas canister. These carry a ‘shot’ of compressed air and are a good way to get your tyre up to a pressure that’s safe enough to ride to your nearest motorcycle dealer or petrol station in order to properly inflate the tyre.

The Best Motorcycle Tyre Pumps

So which method of tyre inflation is best for you? We’ve tracked down some of the best pumps and tyre inflators for use in different situations.

Track Pumps

So named because they were designed for racing cyclists competing on oval tracks. Their racing bike tyres required high pressures (over 100psi) and a traditional hand pump couldn’t quite provide the pressure required. So these track pumps, with their large cylinders and upright position enable you to quickly squeeze an armful of air into your tyre using your upper body and not just your bicep to do the work.

They’re a good choice for home use and popular with track day riders and racers. They usually come with a Schrader valve, which works on motorbikes, mountain bikes and car tyres and a Presta adapter (for racing bicycles). Some also have an adapter kit to use when inflating footballs, bouncy castles, adult inflatables…

The only thing to look out for on these pumps is the pressure gauge. Most track pumps are designed for racing bicycles and so the gauge goes from 0psi to around 140mpi. Seeing as most motorcycle applications are between the 28 and 36psi mark, you’ll probably struggle to get a really accurate reading. It’s best to overinflate the tyre and then use a quality motorcycle tyre pressure gauge to get the pressure spot-on.

gear gremlin gg171 stirrup pump motorcycle - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Best Value

£15.99

Manually operated pump with an analogue dial, the Gear Gremlin is suitable for use on motorcycles, scooters and other vehicles. Height: 57cm, width: 22cm with a tube thickness of 7cm. Ideal for quick inflation with minimal effort and compact enough to fit into a corner of your garage when not in use.

motorcycle tyre floor pump - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Our Pick

£28

Using a metal barrel and featuring a 34″ long rubber hose, this quality track pump comes with all the adapters you’ll need including Presta, Schrader, and Dunlop, as well as adapters to inflate balls, lilos, paddling pools, etc. The dial can be set to the designed pressure, making it easy for you to inflate to an accurate pressure. 

Foot Pumps

These come in either single or twin cylinder designs. Much like a track pump, they’ll inflate just about everything. They are usually designed with motorised vehicles in mind and so the pressure gauge tends to run from 0 – 50psi, making it easier for you to get a more accurate reading straight from the pump, without needing to use a tyre pressure gauge. Although for track riding, we’d always recommend double-checking with a dedicated tyre pressure gauge.

michelin motorbike tyre foot pump - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Best Value

£28.99

The robust and durable design makes this foot pump incredibly stable while in use. With a rubber-coated footplate that protects against premature wear, you won’t slip when inflating your tyres. The 60cm hose allows room for positioning without hindering the air intake. The analogue dial allows for easy viewing of the tyre pressure up to a maximum of 100psi.

premium motorcycle tyre foot pump - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Our Pick

£34.99

With a maximum pressure of 10 BAR / 140psi, Heyner’s double-barrel foot pump gives high precision and requires the least amount of effort thanks to its double barrel design. Complete with a 60cm length air hose and different nozzles, it fits the majority of tyre valves. For secure storage and prevention of damage, Heyner includes a handy bag.

Electric Pumps

These come in either single or twin cylinder designs. Much like a track pump, they’ll inflate just about everything. They are usually designed with motorised vehicles in mind and so the pressure gauge tends to run from 0 – 50psi, making it easier for you to get a more accurate reading straight from the pump, without needing to use a tyre pressure gauge. Although for track riding, we’d always recommend double-checking with a dedicated tyre pressure gauge.

electric battery operated tyre inflator - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Best Value

£34.99

Complete with three values, PSI, BAR and kg/cm2, this LED digital electric air compressor is pistol-shaped for more ergonomic design and portability. It can be used cordless. The battery takes 3 hours of charge for around 30 minutes of continuous use. Featuring various fittings to fit most tyre valves, it is suitable for use in low light thanks to its illuminated display.

beaspire electric tyre pump - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Our Pick

£39.99

This is our best pick as it’s a really small device, that’ll inflate a motorcycle tyre in three minutes. You can set your desired pressure and let it do the work. Not only that; it doubles as a 3000 mAh USB power bank to charge your phone while on the go (handy if you’re stranded) and it’ll charge via USB too, meaning you don’t need to carry a separate charger. All-in-all, a handy bit of kit for any motorcycle tourer.

Gas Canisters

If you have a motorcycle puncture repair kit then you’ll be familiar with these gas canisters. If you’ve ever seen them lying by the side of the road, then it’s probably not a sign that a motorcyclist has been fixing their puncture but more likely a smaller canister that contained Nitrous Oxide, which is also known as laughing gas and used by people looking to get a quick high.

Anyway, back to the motorbike versions. They commonly come in sizes of 12g, 16g and 25g and 50g. This refers to the weight of the compressed air they contain. You just screw them in and they discharge their contents. Be careful as the canister will freeze when the air is discharged, so use gloves.

To give you a rough idea, a 16g cartridge will inflate a motorcycle tyre by around 5-7psi. So if you want to get from the middle of nowhere with a flat tyre, to a petrol station where you can pump it up properly, you’ll need at least three 16g canisters to get your tyre up to around 15-20psi, which is still very low.

Depending on your tyre’s construction, this might not be enough to get rolling, which is why it’s a good idea to buy the largest canisters you can and also carry a tiny bicycle pump.

gas canister tyre inflation 1024x1024 - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
No nonsense

£19.99

If you just want a few gas canisters to get you ought of a tight spot, then this pack of 10 x 16g canisters and application valve is all you need. Each canister should add around 5psi into your tyre, meaning you’ll need at least 3 to get your tyre from flat up to a safe level. If you already have a motorcycle puncture repair kit then this is a cheap way of replacing the spent canisters.

gear gremlin gg170 tyre repair kit motorbike - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators
Full Setup

£29.99

This Gear Gremlin kit comes with everything you need to fix a puncture on either the front or rear tyre of your motorcycle. You remove the offending object, clean out the hole, then insert the bung with a bit of glue, pull it back through and then clip off the ends. The gas cartridges enable you to pump up the tyre and you’re good to go. A great item for your under seat storage.

Get a decent tyre pressure gauge

best motorcycle tyre pressure gauge 305x305 - Motorcycle Tyre Pumps and Inflators

Tyre pressures make all the difference to the way your motorcycle rides and feels. You can get away with sloppy pressures in the average car but not on a bike. Check out our guide to the best motorcycle tyre pressure gauges to pick a quality gauge – either analogue or digital – at a price point you can afford.

Motorcycle Tyre Pressure FAQs

How often should I check my motorcycle tyre pressures?
This depends on how many miles you’re doing but you should check them at least once a month. If your bike has been stored for a few weeks, it’s worth checking your tyres before you head out – it only takes 2 minutes.

Sources

Thanks to the following websites which helped us research and write this motorcycle tyre inflation guide:

https://www.versys1000.com/index.php?topic=15822.0